CONSCIOUS STRUGGLE

REFLECTION

EDITION 5

Surrounded with all kinds of advertisements in every aspect of daily life, unconfident consumers are unconsciously manipulated to form values conveyed by hidden ideas of advertisements. The theme of our manifesto is manipulating advertising. Our practical work falls into three categories: the messages, the effects and the questions. My response focuses on consumers’ conscious struggle due to the effects of manipulating advertising. When the values conveyed by advertisements become major within society, social pressures increase for consumers whose original beliefs and desires conflict with the demands of the society, followed by struggle in the conscious self.[1]I created two slides (Figure 1-8). It is a process of being exposed to increasing manipulating information and more confused to determine opinions of existence.

Texts projection was inspired by Fiona Banner’s 1066 and Shirin Neshat’s Unveiling, showing the forces advertisements bring to consumers. To further suggest its power of shaping cultural norms, I set the color of background same as figures’ clothes initially, creating an effect of figures absorbed into the background, inspired by Anthea Hamilton’s Brick Suit. [2]

Using blur to capture disorientation was originally inspired by Amrou Al-Kadhi and Holly Falconer’s Glamrou (Figure 9). A triple exposure is used to describe the experience that can fracture your sense of self as well as hold it together.[3] Multiple positions of the model in drag indicate multiple identities. The combination of separation and overlay creating blur and shadow suggests the disorientation. I felt the confusion and struggle with identifying self, very related to my idea. Therefore, I decided to create layered clear figures with blurry movements as the hesitation of determining a way of existence. However, after looking through my photos and thinking over the emphasis to make, I realized my real intention was only to show the conscious of being unsettled, unclear and messy. Blur is unclear itself and makes figures unable to sit in the image while clear captures are too solid. That is why I only kept blur as the key element in my final work.

Figure 9: Al-Kadhi and Holly Falconer 2016. Glamrou.

I also did an installation, producing a visual mess and uncertainty (Figure 10-17). However, photography work is better displayed in a zine.

I also had a plan for overlaid texts printed on reflective material where readers could see their distorted faces, encouraging self-reflection on psychological activities while making a choice.

From this project, I have learnt to express the conscious struggle through blur, distorted surfaces, color-changing lighting, disorganized texts and reflective materials. Technically, I have experimented with multiple or long exposure and projection. I am satisfied with the elements shown in my work. I think I have showed the conscious struggle on mind to people suffering from being unable to achieve authenticity, the way of existing fully controlled by one self, regardless of external pressure.[4] And I believe my work helps them realize what is happening on their mind while making a choice, think about the reasons and consequences.

However, with more time, I would experiment with advertisements projection instead of texts to relate to the theme more closely, sound for the slides to strengthen the effect of struggle, plastic sheet in portrait photography to create another way of showing conscious struggle and projection mapping to create a better visual effect. Also, I might develop my idea to more specific reasons of this conscious struggle due to manipulating advertising.

548 without footnotes + captions + Bibliography

Bibliography

Al-Kadhi, Amrou, and Holly Falconer, Glamrou (London: Hayward Gallery, 2019)

Baliousis, Michael, and Stephen Joseph, and P Linley, and John Maltby, and Alex Wood, ‘The Authentic Personality: A Theoretical and Empirical Conceptualization and the Development of the Authenticity Scale’, Journal of Counseling Psychology, 55:3 (2008), 385-399

Heidegger, Martin, Being and Time (New York: Harper Perennial Modern Thought, 2008)

Kierkegaard, Søren, The Present Age (New York: Harper Torchbooks, 1962)

Marx, Karl, Capital, Volume I (New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 2019)

Sartre, Jean-Paul, Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology (New York: Washington Square Press, 1992)


[1] My view on this has been inspired by my reading of Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology (New York: Washington Square Press, 1992). Alex, Wood & P, Linley & John, Maltby & Michael, Baliousis & Stephen, Joseph, ‘The Authentic Personality: A Theoretical and Empirical Conceptualization and the Development of the Authenticity Scale’, Journal of Counseling Psychology, 55:3 (2008), 385-399. And Martin Heidegger, Being and Time (New York: Harper Perennial Modern Thought, 2008).

[2] Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I (New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 2019).

[3] Amrou Al-Kadhi and Holly Falconer, Glamrou (London: Hayward Gallery, 2019).

[4] Søren Kierkegaard, The Present Age (New York: Harper Torchbooks, 1962).

EDITION 4

Surrounded with all kinds of advertisements in every aspect of daily life, unconfident consumers are unconsciously manipulated to form values conveyed by hidden ideas of advertisements. The theme of our manifesto is manipulating advertising. Our practical work falls into three categories: the messages, the effects and the questions. My response focuses on consumers’ conscious struggle due to the effects of manipulating advertising.When the values conveyed by advertisements become major within society, social pressures increase for consumers whose original beliefs and desires conflict with the demands of the society, following struggle in the conscious self.[1]

I created two slides (Figure 1-8). It is a process of being exposed to increasing manipulating information and more confused to determine opinions of existence.

Texts projection was inspired by Fiona Banner’s 1066and Shirin Neshat’s Unveiling, showing the forces advertisements bring to consumers. To further suggest its power of shaping cultural norms, I set the color of background same as figures’ clothes initially, creating an effect of figures absorbed into the background, inspired by Anthea Hamilton’s Brick Suit.[2]

Using blur to capture disorientation was originally inspired by Amrou Al-Kadhi and Holly Falconer’s Glamrou (Figure 9). A triple exposure is used to describe the experience that can fracture your sense of self as well as hold it together.[3]Multiple positions of the model in drag indicate multiple identities. The combination of separation and overlay creating blur and shadow suggests the disorientation. I felt the confusion and struggle with identifying self, very related to my idea. Therefore, I decided to create layered clear figures with blurry movements as the hesitation of determining a way of existence. However, after looking through my photos and thinking over the emphasis to make, I realized my real intention was only to show the conscious of being unsettled, unclear and messy. Blur is unclear itself and makes figures unable to sit in the image while clear captures are too solid. That is why I only kept blur as the key element in my final work.

Figure 9: Al-Kadhi and Holly Falconer 2016. Glamrou.

I also did an installation, producing a visual mess and uncertainty (Figure 10-17). However, photography work is better displayed in a zine.

I also had a plan for overlaid texts printed on reflective material where readers could see their distorted faces, encouraging self-reflection on psychological activities while making a choice.

From this project, I have learnt expressing conscious struggle through blur, distorted surfaces, color-changing lighting, disorganized texts and reflective materials. Technically, I have experimented with multiple or long exposure and projection. I think I have achieved my goal to show the conscious struggle to people suffering from being unable to achieve authenticity, the way of existing fully controlled by oneself, regardless of external pressure, to help them realize what is happening on their mind while making a choice, think about the reasons and consequences,because every element of my work contributes to convey my idea.[4]

With more time, I would experiment with advertisements projection instead of texts to relate to the theme closelier, sound for the slides to strengthen the effect of struggle, plastic sheet in portrait photography to create another way of showing conscious struggle and projection mapping to create a better visual effect. Also, I might develop my idea to more specific reasons of this conscious struggledue to manipulating advertising.

Bibliography

Al-Kadhi, Amrou, and Holly Falconer, Glamrou (London: Hayward Gallery, 2019)

Baliousis, Michael, and Stephen Joseph, and P Linley, and John Maltby, and Alex Wood, ‘The Authentic Personality: A Theoretical and Empirical Conceptualization and the Development of the Authenticity Scale’, Journal of Counseling Psychology, 55:3 (2008), 385-399

Heidegger, Martin, Being and Time (New York: Harper Perennial Modern Thought, 2008)

Kierkegaard, Søren, The Present Age (New York: Harper Torchbooks, 1962)

Marx, Karl, Capital, Volume I (New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 2019)Sartre, Jean-Paul, Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology (New York: Washington Square Press, 1992)


[1]My view on this has been inspired by my reading of Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology (New York: Washington Square Press, 1992). Alex, Wood & P, Linley & John, Maltby & Michael, Baliousis & Stephen, Joseph, ‘The Authentic Personality: A Theoretical and Empirical Conceptualization and the Development of the Authenticity Scale’, Journal of Counseling Psychology, 55:3 (2008), 385-399. And Martin Heidegger, Being and Time (New York: Harper Perennial Modern Thought, 2008).

[2]Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I (New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 2019).

[3]Amrou Al-Kadhi and Holly Falconer, Glamrou(London: Hayward Gallery, 2019).

[4]Søren Kierkegaard, The Present Age (New York: Harper Torchbooks, 1962).


REFLECTION

EDITION 3

Surrounded with all kinds of advertisements in every aspect of daily life, unconfident consumers are unconsciously manipulated to form values conveyed by hidden ideas of advertisements. When the values become major within society, social pressures increase for consumers whose original beliefs and desires conflict with the demands of the society, following struggle in the conscious self.[1]The aim of my photography work is to show this conscious struggle to people suffering from being unable to achieve authenticity, the way of existing fully controlled by oneself, regardless of external pressure, to help them realize what is happening on their mind while making a choice, think about the reasons and consequences.[2]

I created two slides of four photos from a clear female or male figure to blur gradually with “cross-dissolve” while the contrast between the color of the background and figures’ clothes gets stronger. Both the background and figures were projected with unreadable dense texts. It is a process of being exposed to increasing manipulating information and more confused to determine opinions of existence.

Texts projection was inspired by Fiona Banner’s 1066and Shirin Neshat’s Unveiling, showing the forces advertisements bring to consumers. To further suggest its power of shaping cultural norms, I set the color of background same as figures’ clothes initially, creating an effect of figures absorbed into the background, inspired by Anthea Hamilton’s Brick Suit.[3]

Using blur to capture disorientation was originally inspired by Amrou Al-Kadhi and Holly Falconer’s Glamrou.

A triple exposure is used to describe the experience that can fracture your sense of self as well as hold it together.[4]Multiple positions of the model in drag indicate multiple identities. The combination of separation and overlay creating blur and shadow suggests the disorientation. I felt the confusion and struggle with identifying self, very related to my idea. Therefore, I decided to create layered clear figures with blurry movements as the hesitation of determining a way of existence. However, after looking through my photos and thinking over the emphasis to make, I realized my real intention was only to show the conscious of being unsettled, unclear and messy. Blur is unclear itself and makes figures unable to sit in the image while clear captures are too solid. That is why I only kept blur as the key element in my final work.

I also did an installation with wafted teared colorful paper strips projected with a female saying the same texts with Echo Delay Audio Effect under color-changing lighting, producing a visual mess and uncertainty. However, photography work is better displayed in a zine. I also had a plan for overlaid texts printed on reflective material where readers could see their distorted faces, encouraging self-reflection on psychological activities while making a choice.

From this project, I have learnt expressing struggle through blur, distorted surfaces, color-changing lighting, disorganized texts and reflective materials. Technically, I have experimented with multiple or long exposure and projection. I think I have achieved my goal because every element of my work contributes to convey my idea. With more time, I would experiment with advertisements projection instead of texts, sound for the slides, plastic paper in portrait photography and projection mapping. Also, I might develop my idea to reasons of the struggle.


[1]My view on this has been inspired by my reading of Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology (New York: Washington Square Press, 1992). Alex, Wood & P, Linley & John, Maltby & Michael, Baliousis & Stephen, Joseph, ‘The Authentic Personality: A Theoretical and Empirical Conceptualization and the Development of the Authenticity Scale’, Journal of Counseling Psychology, 55:3 (2008), 385-399. And Martin Heidegger, Being and Time (New York: Harper Perennial Modern Thought, 2008).

[2]Søren Kierkegaard, The Present Age (New York: Harper Torchbooks, 1962).

[3]Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I (New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 2019).

[4]Amrou AI-Kadhi and Holly Falconer, Glamrou(London: Hayward Gallery, 2019).

EDITION 2

Surrounded with all kinds of advertisements in every aspect of daily life, unconfident consumers are unconsciously manipulated to form values conveyed by hidden ideas of advertisements. When the values become major within society, social pressures increase for consumers whose original beliefs and desires conflict with the demands of the society, which follows struggle in the conscious self.[1]The aim of my photography work is to show this conscious struggle to people suffering from not being able to achieve authenticity, the way of existing where you are in full control, regardless of external pressure, to help them realize what is happening on their mind while making a choice, think about the reasons behind and be more aware of the consequences.[2]

I created two sets of slides, each consisting of four photos in sequence of a clear female or male figure to blur gradually with “cross-dissolve” while the contrast between the color of the background and figures’ clothes gets stronger. Both the background and figures were projected with unreadable dense texts. It is a process of being exposed to increasing manipulating information and becoming more confused to determine opinions of existence.

The idea of projecting texts came from Fiona Banner’s installation work, 1066, wall projection as part of ‘Words to be Spoken Aloud’, Turner Contemporary, 2013.Banner interpreted a visual scene in the Bayeux Tapestry with winding and increasingly dense texts to show the brutality of the Battle of Hastings.[3][4]Another inspiration was from Shirin Nashat’s Unveiling, a series of photographs of Islamic females’ face or body written with poems expressing female independence to question the culture of “the veil” and female identity in Islam.[5]The texts I used were the scene I wrote for the manifesto where “I” struggled with making a choice between pasta and salad for dinner. It shows theforces and influence advertisements bring to consumers.

To further suggest the power of shaping cultural norms of advertisements, I set the color of background same as the figures’ clothes initially, creating an effect of the figures getting absorbed into the background, which was inspired by Anthea Hamilton’s installation work, Brick Suit.[6]

Using blur to capture disorientation was originally inspired by Amrou Al-Kadhi and Holly Falconer’s portrait, GlamrouI saw at the exhibition ‘Kiss My Genders’, Hayward Gallery, 2019. A triple exposure is used to describe the experience that can fracture your sense of self as well as hold it together.[7]It captures multiple positions of the model in drag in one image, which indicates multiple identities as one person especially in queer context. The combination of the separation and overlay of the positions that creates a sense of blur and shadow suggests the disorientation. I felt the confusion and struggle of the model with identifying self, which was very related to what I wanted to show in my work. Therefore, I decided to try triple exposure to create a layered clear image as well as long exposure to record blurry movements as the hesitation of determining a way of existence. However, when I looked through the contact sheet and thought over the emphasis I wanted to make in the context of manipulating advertisements, I realized my real intention was only to show the conscious of being unsettled, unclear and messy. And simply blur is obviously unclear itself and makes the figure unable to sit in the image while clear captures are too solid.

COULD YOU DEVELOP THIS FURTHER? HOW MIGHT YOU ATTEMPT TO DO THAT?

I have also experimented and thought about other medias to address this phenomenon. I did an installation set with wafted teared colorful paper strips as background projected with a female saying the texts I wrote for the manifesto under constantly color-changing lighting. The creation of distorted background was inspired by Pascal Gaudefroy’s installation work, Litote & Hyperbole. The color scheme was influenced by Fiona Banner’s installation work, CMYK vs RGB. The color-changing environment, projection on distorted surface and texts content produced the feeling of mess. To further create the sense of uncertainty, I added Echo Delay Audio Effect. However, photography work is better displayed in a zine than installation. I also had a plan for overlaid texts printing on reflective material such as mirror card. When viewers read the texts, they could see their distorted face, which encourages self-reflection on their psychological activities while making a purchase.In conclusion, in response to our group manifesto about manipulating advertisements, I focused on its effect on individuals and visualized it through texts projection and gradually blurred portrait photographs.

From this project, I have learnt different ways of expressing struggle, such as layered images, blur, distorted surfaces, reflective materials, disorganized or layered texts, fluttering pages and color-changing lighting. Technically, I have experimented with multiple exposure, long exposure, projection and color gel. I think I have achieved my goal because there is a reason for every single setting of my work and all elements are related to my idea. With more time, I would try to project advertisements instead of texts on the background and model, experiment with sound that could be added to the slides, find out the effect of plastic paper in portrait photography and explore projection mapping and color-changing lighting. Also, I might think further over my idea and develop it to the reasons of the struggle.


[1]My view on this has been inspired by my reading of Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology (New York: Washington Square Press, 1992). Alex, Wood & P, Linley & John, Maltby & Michael, Baliousis & Stephen, Joseph, ‘The Authentic Personality: A Theoretical and Empirical Conceptualization and the Development of the Authenticity Scale’, Journal of Counseling Psychology, 55:3 (2008), 385-399. And Martin Heidegger, Being and Time (New York: Harper Perennial Modern Thought, 2008).

[2]Søren Kierkegaard, The Present Age (New York: Harper Torchbooks, 1962).

[3]‘Postscript: An Ambitious Take on Conceptual Art and Writing at the Power Plant’, Caitlin Sutherland (31 July 2013) https://www.dailyserving.com/2013/07/postscript-an-ambitious-take-on-conceptual-art-and-writing-at-the-power-plant/[Accessed 13 August 2019].

[4]‘Fiona Banner: The Naked Ear’, Fifth Street Gallery https://www.frithstreetgallery.com/exhibitions/fiona-banner-the-naked-ear[Accessed 13 August 2019].

[5]‘Shirin Neshat Unveiling (1993)’, Hemispheric Institute https://hemisphericinstitute.org/en/hidvl-collections/item/2727-shirin-neshat-unveiling-1993[Accessed 13 August 2019].

[6]Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I (New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 2019).

[7]Amrou AI-Kadhi and Holly Falconer, Glamrou(London: Hayward Gallery, 2019).

EDITION 1

Surrounded with all kinds of advertisements in every aspect of daily life, unconfident consumers are unconsciously manipulated to form values conveyed by hidden ideas of advertisements. When the values become major, social pressures increase for consumers whose original beliefs and desires conflict with the demands of the society, which follows struggle in the conscious self.[1][2][3]My photography work is to show this struggle to people suffering from not being able to achieve authenticity.[4]

I created two sets of slides, each consisting of four photos in sequence of a clear female or male figure to blur gradually with “cross-dissolve” while the contrast between the color of the background and figures’ clothes gets stronger. Both the background and figures were projected with unreadable dense texts. It is a process of being exposed to increasing manipulating information and becoming more confused to determine opinions of existence.

The idea of projecting texts came from Fiona Banner’s installation work, 1066, wall projection as part of ‘Words to be Spoken Aloud’, Turner Contemporary, 2013.Banner interpreted a visual scene in the Bayeux Tapestry with winding and increasingly dense texts to show the brutality of the Battle of Hastings.[5][6]Another inspiration was from Shirin Nashat’s Unveiling, a series of photographs of Islamic females’ face or body written with poems expressing female independence to question the culture of “the veil” and female identity in Islam.[7]The texts I used were the scene I wrote for the manifesto where “I” struggled with making a choice between pasta and salad for dinner. It shows theforces and influence advertisements bring to consumers.

To further suggest the power of shaping cultural norms of advertisements, I set the color of background same as the figures’ clothes initially, creating an effect of the figures getting absorbed into the background, which was inspired by Anthea Hamilton’s installation work, Brick Suit.[8]

Using blur to capture disorientation was originally inspired by Amrou Al-Kadhi and Holly Falconer’s portrait, GlamrouI saw at the exhibition ‘Kiss My Genders’, Hayward Gallery, 2019. A triple exposure is used to describe the experience that can fracture your sense of self as well as hold it together.[9]I decided on only displaying blur through long exposure instead of a clearly layered image because it expressed “struggle”, “unclear”, “mess” and “hesitation” better.

I have also experimented and thought about other medias to address this phenomenon. I did an installation set with wafted teared colorful paper strips as background projected with a female saying the texts I wrote for the manifesto under constantly color-changing lighting. The creation of distorted background was inspired by Pascal Gaudefroy’s installation work, Litote & Hyperbole. The color scheme was influenced by Fiona Banner’s installation work, CMYK vs RGB. To further create the sense of uncertainty, I added Echo Delay Audio Effect. However, photography work is better displayed in a zine than installation. I also had a plan for overlaid text printing on reflective material such as mirror card. When viewers read the texts, they could see their distorted face, which encourages self-reflection.

In conclusion, in response to our group manifesto about manipulating advertisements, I focused on its effect on individuals and visualized it through texts projection and gradually blurred portrait photographs.


[1]Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology (New York: Washington Square Press, 1992).

[2]Alex, Wood & P, Linley & John, Maltby & Michael, Baliousis & Stephen, Joseph, ‘The Authentic Personality: A Theoretical and Empirical Conceptualization and the Development of the Authenticity Scale’, Journal of Counseling Psychology, 55:3 (2008), 385-399.

[3]Martin Heidegger, Being and Time (New York: Harper Perennial Modern Thought, 2008).

[4]Søren Kierkegaard, The Present Age (New York: Harper Torchbooks, 1962).

[5]‘Postscript: An Ambitious Take on Conceptual Art and Writing at the Power Plant’, Caitlin Sutherland (31 July 2013) https://www.dailyserving.com/2013/07/postscript-an-ambitious-take-on-conceptual-art-and-writing-at-the-power-plant/[Accessed 13 August 2019].

[6]‘Fiona Banner: The Naked Ear’, Fifth Street Gallery https://www.frithstreetgallery.com/exhibitions/fiona-banner-the-naked-ear[Accessed 13 August 2019].

[7]‘Shirin Neshat Unveiling (1993)’, Hemispheric Institute https://hemisphericinstitute.org/en/hidvl-collections/item/2727-shirin-neshat-unveiling-1993[Accessed 13 August 2019].

[8]Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I (New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 2019).

[9]Amrou AI-Kadhi and Holly Falconer, Glamrou(London: Hayward Gallery, 2019), p. 

MANIFESTO

EDITION 2

Buy this…

▢  A sports car

▢  A spouse

▢  A house

▢  A diamond

▢  A label

▢  Happiness

Sponsored content

I am standing in front of a fridge shelf at a supermarket. It is time to decide what to eat for dinner. I am hungry and I want to reach for the delicious and filling pasta. There is a salad containing chicken breast and lettuce without any starch. I see “Superfood”, “Organic”, “Nature”, “Handmade”. It reminds me of a fit model happily having a salad on the ad at a bus stand just now, on social media this morning, on TV last night. There are so many voices. “You want to have that salad.” “You want to be that fit model.” “You will be happy.” I am very hungry. I choose the salad.

What am I selling you?

What is right and what is wrong?

Do we think enough before we act?

Do we really know what we are buying?

Is this/Am I the best choice on offer?

Which of us is responsible for the truth?

Are you buying a single product or beginning a series of choices?

Here is the answer, but what was your question?

Value(d) shopper.

In highly saturated media markets, increasingly vulnerable and insecure consumers are being deeply and unconsciously manipulated by targeted messages in the form of ideas, information or products.

Buying into the values sold by advertisers strips us of our individuality and forces us into prescribed norms. Questioning the impact of advertising on societal values is crucial.

People should be liberated from fitting into prescribed norms by critical thinking and questioning what is “normal”. We want to bring more truth into advertising.

Think before you trust. What you are seeing might be fake. Question it before you make your determination. Think while you see, see while you think. Believing can be easy. Keep questioning. Your values and the values you are being sold.

Do we really know what we are buying?

Shopping List: 

▢  Authenticity

▢  Peace of mind

▢  Respect

▢  Inclusivity

▢  Diversity

▢  Acceptance

This is what we have so far and we’ll edit it this weekend:

EDITION 1

(Is advertising too strong or are you too weak?)

Buy this

  • A sports car
  • Marriage
  • A nationality
  • Happiness
  • Social values

I am standing in front of a fridge shelf at a supermarket. It is time to decide what to eat for dinner. I am hungry and I want to reach for the delicious and filling pasta. There is a salad containing chicken breast and lettuce without any starch. I see “Superfood”, “Organic”, “Nature”, “Handmade”. It reminds me of a skinny fit girl happily having a salad on the ad at a bus stand just now, on social media this morning, on TV last night. I hear lots of voice going on. “You want to have that salad.” “You want to be that skinny fit girl.” “You will be happy.” I am very hungry. I choose the salad.

In highly saturated media markets, vulnerable or insecure consumers are being deeply and unconsciously psychologically manipulated by advertisements in the form of ideas, information or products.

Buying into the values sold by advertisers strips us of our individuality and authenticity and forces us into prescribed norms. We want to question the impact advertising has on our social values.

Both the advertisers and consumers should be responsible for this phenomenon.

The truth is your responsibility. What am I selling you? 

Do you really know what you are buying?

Can you recognize manipulating advertising? Do you understand the hidden message? What is right and what is wrong? Have you thought enough before you act?

Think it over. The world is filled with choices. Think three times before you act.

Think while you see. Seeing can be fake, but it can be true. Looking at it for a longer time, or it may be misunderstood. Don’t determine before you take a close look. See first, and think. Think while seeing. See while thinking.

Think before you trust. Telling you is not forcing you. It is for your reference. Mainstream can be wrong for you. It can also be right. It is hard to believe that believing can be easy. Do not be gullible, but also try to trust. Doubt first, and trust. Trust while doubting ingeniously. Doubt while trusting.

Think before you act. Rebellion can be cool, it can also be dangerous. You don’t have to try, but you can. If you want to try, think of what would happen worst in advance. Passive first, and optimistic. Optimistic during passive, passive during optimistic.

Keep asking yourself because no one is forcing you. You are forcing yourself.

People should be liberated from fitting into prescribed norms by critical thinking and questioning what is “normal”. Advertisers should be honest and authentic.

DINGLE?.