DIRECTED VS UNDIRECTED

INVESTIGATION DRAFT 4

Wandering in London with my partner Olivia, I became interested in direction signs and how citizens seemed directed on autopilot while Olivia was attracted to ‘flawed beauty’ of marks of time on architecture.[1]

At the beginning, I wanted to create a space to bring consciousness to citizens and demonstrate how autopilot leaves no trace in life (Figure 1).[2] It was going to be a double layered space with a narrow corridor to force people to move, suggesting direction signs’ effect. In the inner space, each wall would project a video to create a sense of moving while viewers would actually only turn around in the center watching the videos (Figure 2-4), indicating autopilot not creating an actual trace. The shaky videos would bring uncomfortable and dizzy feelings and bring back consciousness, similar to the situation of getting lost. Finally, viewers would escape consciously.

This idea was influenced by Bruce Nauman’s Changing Light Corridor with Rooms (Figure 5). The discomforting corridors create the feeling of unease. The side rooms offer a brief sense of liberation, yet they also produce a feeling of self-consciousness due to the flashing light and confined space. I was inspired by the effects physical environments can have on people, especially the feeling of unease that comes from being in a space too compressed and how it brings consciousness.[3] I found it helpful with achieving my intention of making viewers realize the effects of autopilot. Therefore, I decided to build a space that both oriented and disoriented viewers, which would repel them in the end.

Figure 5. Taken from https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/nauman-changing-light-corridor-with-rooms-ar00044.

However, after chatting with people, I realized citizens had their choices and stories behind the directions they followed. How the city and citizens look depends on the perspectives how we observe them, connected to Olivia’s idea of appreciating muted beauty.[4] Olivia encourages a different perspective of the aspect of the passage of time while I focus on the aspect of the general view on the city and citizens. In the end, I created a different installation (Figures 6-9), dividing the floor to variable units of squares consisting of four arrows each, representing how the city was divided by crossings. No matter how people move in the squares, they always seem directed to go straight, left or right, the typical patterns of citizens’ navigation.

Three additive primary colors and a clear color were used to reproduce a broad array of colors. Observing people walking into and out of the cuboids, as you move around, multiple color combinations can be seen while from one spot, only single combination is seen (Figure 10-13). This also applies to our way of perceiving the city and citizens; different perspectives bring new discoveries while a single perspective may generate the same vision each day.

This work was inspired by Olafur Eliasson’s installations, Seu corpo da obra (Your body of work) (Figure 14), Colour activity house (Figure 15) and Your rainbow panorama (Figure 16). Color compositions change in response to viewers’ movement through the space.[5] Viewers are co-producers of color and their image of reality.[6] We are viewers or producers of history, though we contribute more than we receive, to our own perception of it.[7] I was inspired by the setting of having viewers as a dynamic part of creators of the artwork. I found it relevant to my idea of observers as a vital role in creating the view of the city and citizens. Therefore, I decided to build a space for viewers to be able to change the view of colors while moving, representing the initiative of forming their experience in the city and with other citizens.

From this project, I have learnt how to use viewers as an active part of artwork and to relate the color phenomenon to the formation of our views towards our surroundings. Although it is an installation, I think the idea could also apply to photography work by placing people in different colors to represent their multiple personalities or emotions. My intention is to encourage citizens to see the city and each other from refreshing perspectives, to find different aspects of them over instant assumptions, and help them realize they act as an active and essential role in getting an impression from their living environment. I think I have succeeded in terms of the connection between the changing perception of colors through moving and multi-dimensional understandings of the city and citizens. However, I hope to interpret the relationship between citizens, and between citizens and the city through a more personal or radical approach. My ideas can sometimes be too generalized for some people because they may behave as directly perceived while others may have their own preferences for the way they see the city and other people. 

With more time, I would experiment with the color schemes for direction signs in the United Kingdom instead of RGB to relate to the theme more closely. [8] Installing my work in busy areas of the city could capture people’s authentic interaction with it. Also, I would develop my idea from a more personal perspective instead of based on my opinions on the majority of citizens, because it is easy to fall into my own assumptions rather than facts while doing this.

850 without footnotes + captions + Bibliography

Bibliography

Berg, Anders, (2015), ‘Seu corpo da obra (Your body of work), 2011’, https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK107097/seu-corpo-da-obra-your-body-of-work [Accessed 14 September 2019]

e-flux, (15 June 2011), ‘Olafur Eliasson shows Your body of work in San Paulo’, https://www.e-flux.com/announcements/35440/olafur-eliasson-shows-your-body-of-work-in-sao-paulo/ [Accessed 14 September 2019]

Gold, Taro, Living Wabi Sabi: The True Beauty of Your Life (Singapore: Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2004)

Great Britain: Department of Transport, Know Your Traffic Signs (London: TSO, 2010)

Keizo, KIOKU, (2010), ‘Colour activity house, 2010’, https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK100040/colour-activity-house [Accessed 14 September 2019]

Lawrence, Robyn, Simply Imperfect: Revising the Wabi-Sabi House (Gabriola Island: New Society Publishers, 2011)

Moderna Museet, (2015), ‘The central themes’, https://www.modernamuseet.se/stockholm/en/exhibitions/olafur-eliasson/about-the-exhibition/ [Accessed 14 September 2019]

Tate, (October 2011), ‘Bruce Nauman Changing Light Corridor with Rooms 1971’, https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/nauman-changing-light-corridor-with-rooms-ar00044 [Accessed 19 September 2019]

Wittmann, Marc, Felt Time: The Psychology of How We Perceive Time (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2016)

‘Your rainbow panorama, 2006-2011’, (2011) https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK100551/your-rainbow-panorama [Accessed 14 September 2019]


[1] Taro Gold, Living Wabi Sabi: The True Beauty of Your Life (Singapore: Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2004)

[2] Marc Wittmann, Felt Time: The Psychology of How We Perceive Time (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2016)

[3] ‘Bruce Nauman Changing Light Corridor with Rooms 1971’, Tate (October 2011) https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/nauman-changing-light-corridor-with-rooms-ar00044 [Accessed 19 September 2019].

[4] Robyn Griggs Lawrence, Simply Imperfect: Revising the Wabi-Sabi House (Gabriola Island: New Society Publishers, 2011)

[5] ‘Seu corpo da obra (Your body of work), 2011’, Anders Sune Berg (2015) https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK107097/seu-corpo-da-obra-your-body-of-work [Accessed 14 September 2019]. ‘Colour activity house, 2010’, KIOKU Keizo (2010)https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK100040/colour-activity-house [Accessed 14 September 2019]. ‘Your rainbow panorama, 2006-2011’, (2011) https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK100551/your-rainbow-panorama [Accessed 14 September 2019].

[6] ‘The central themes’, Moderna Museet (2015) https://www.modernamuseet.se/stockholm/en/exhibitions/olafur-eliasson/about-the-exhibition/ [Accessed 14 September 2019].

[7] ‘Olafur Eliasson shows Your body of work in San Paulo’, e-flux (15 June 2011) https://www.e-flux.com/announcements/35440/olafur-eliasson-shows-your-body-of-work-in-sao-paulo/ [Accessed 14 September 2019].

[8] Great Britain: Department of Transport, Know Your Traffic Signs (London: TSO, 2010)

INVESTIGATION DRAFT 3

Wandering in London with my partner Olivia, I became interested in direction signs and how citizens seemed directed on autopilot while Olivia was attracted to ‘flawed beauty’ of marks of time on architecture.[1]At the beginning, I wanted to create a space to bring consciousness to citizens and demonstrate autopilot mode leaves no trace in life (Figure 1).[2] It was going to be a double layered space with a narrow corridor to force people to move, suggesting the effect of direction signs. In the inner space, each wall would be projected a video to create a sense of moving while viewers would actually only turn around in the center watching the videos (Figure 2-4), indicating autopilot not creating actual trace. The shaky videos would bring uncomfortable and dizzy feelings and bring back consciousness, similar to the situation of getting lost. Finally, viewers would escape consciously.

This idea was influenced by Bruce Nauman’s Changing Light Corridor with Rooms (Figure 5). The discomforting corridors create the feeling of unease. The side rooms offer a brief sense of liberation, yet they also produce a feeling of self-consciousness due to the flashing light and confined space. I was inspired by the effects physical environments can have on people, especially the feeling of unease that comes from being in a space too compressed and how it brings consciousness.[3] I found it helpful with achieving my intention of making viewers realize the effects of autopilot. Therefore, I decided to build a space that both oriented and disoriented viewers, which would repel them in the end.

Figure 5. Taken from https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/nauman-changing-light-corridor-with-rooms-ar00044.

However, after chatting with people, I started to realize citizens had their choices and stories behind the directions they followed. How the city and citizens look depends on the perspectives how we observe them, connected to Olivia’s idea of appreciating muted beauty.[4] Olivia encourages a different perspective of the aspect of the passage of time while I focus on the aspect of the general view on the city and citizens. In the end, I created a different installation (Figures 6-9), dividing the floor to variable units of squares consisting of four arrows each, representing how the city was divided by crossings. No matter how people move in the squares, they always seem directed to go straight, left or right, the typical patterns of citizens’ navigation.

Three additive primary colors and a clear color were used to reproduce a broad array of colors. Observing people walking into and out of the cuboids, as you move around, multiple combinations of colors can be seen while from one spot, only single combination is seen (Figure 10-13). This also applies to our way of perceiving the city and citizens. Different perspectives bring new discoveries while a single perspective may only generate the same vision each day.

This work was inspired by Olafur Eliasson’s installations, Seu corpo da obra (Your body of work) (Figure 14), Colour activity house (Figure 15) and Your rainbow panorama (Figure 16). Compositions of colors change in response to viewers’ movement through the space.[5] Viewers are co-producers of color as well as their image of reality.[6] We are viewers or producers of history itself, seen as we contribute more than we receive.[7] I was inspired by the setting of having viewers as a dynamic part of creators of the artwork. I found it relevant to my idea of observers as a vital role in creating the view of the city and citizens. Therefore, I decided to build a space for viewers to be able to change the view of colors while moving, representing the initiative of forming their experience in the city and with other citizens.

From this project, I have learnt to use viewers as an active part of artwork and to relate the phenomenon of color to the formation of our views towards our surroundings. Although it is an installation, I think the idea also applies to photography work by placing people in different colors to represent their multiple personalities or emotions. The intention of my installation is to encourage citizens to see the city and each other from refreshing perspectives, to find different aspects of them over instant assumptions, and help them realize they act as an active and essential role in getting an impression from their living environment. I think I have succeeded in terms of the connection between the changing perception of colors through moving and multi-dimensional understandings of the city and citizens. However, I hope to interpret the relationship between citizens, and between citizens and the city through a more personal or radical approach. My idea can be too generalized for some citizens because they may have their own preferences for the way of seeing the city and others, or they may behave as they are directly.

With more time, I would experiment with the color schemes for direction signs in United Kingdom instead of RGB to relate to the theme more closely. [8] Installing my work in the busy area of the city could capture citizens’ authentic interaction with it. Also, I would develop my idea in a more personal perspective instead of generating opinions on majority of citizens because it is easy to fall into my own assumptions rather than facts.

850 without footnotes + captions + Bibliography

Bibliography

Berg, Anders, (2015), ‘Seu corpo da obra (Your body of work), 2011’, https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK107097/seu-corpo-da-obra-your-body-of-work [Accessed 14 September 2019]

e-flux, (15 June 2011), ‘Olafur Eliasson shows Your body of work in San Paulo’, https://www.e-flux.com/announcements/35440/olafur-eliasson-shows-your-body-of-work-in-sao-paulo/ [Accessed 14 September 2019]

Gold, Taro, Living Wabi Sabi: The True Beauty of Your Life (Singapore: Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2004)

Great Britain: Department of Transport, Know Your Traffic Signs (London: TSO, 2010)

Keizo, KIOKU, (2010), ‘Colour activity house, 2010’, https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK100040/colour-activity-house [Accessed 14 September 2019]

Lawrence, Robyn, Simply Imperfect: Revising the Wabi-Sabi House (Gabriola Island: New Society Publishers, 2011)

Moderna Museet, (2015), ‘The central themes’, https://www.modernamuseet.se/stockholm/en/exhibitions/olafur-eliasson/about-the-exhibition/ [Accessed 14 September 2019]

Tate, (October 2011), ‘Bruce Nauman Changing Light Corridor with Rooms 1971’, https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/nauman-changing-light-corridor-with-rooms-ar00044 [Accessed 19 September 2019]

Wittmann, Marc, Felt Time: The Psychology of How We Perceive Time (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2016)

‘Your rainbow panorama, 2006-2011’, (2011) https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK100551/your-rainbow-panorama [Accessed 14 September 2019]


[1] Taro Gold, Living Wabi Sabi: The True Beauty of Your Life (Singapore: Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2004)

[2] Marc Wittmann, Felt Time: The Psychology of How We Perceive Time (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2016)

[3] ‘Bruce Nauman Changing Light Corridor with Rooms 1971’, Tate (October 2011) https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/nauman-changing-light-corridor-with-rooms-ar00044 [Accessed 19 September 2019].

[4] Robyn Griggs Lawrence, Simply Imperfect: Revising the Wabi-Sabi House (Gabriola Island: New Society Publishers, 2011)

[5] ‘Seu corpo da obra (Your body of work), 2011’, Anders Sune Berg (2015) https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK107097/seu-corpo-da-obra-your-body-of-work [Accessed 14 September 2019]. ‘Colour activity house, 2010’, KIOKU Keizo (2010)https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK100040/colour-activity-house [Accessed 14 September 2019]. ‘Your rainbow panorama, 2006-2011’, (2011) https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK100551/your-rainbow-panorama [Accessed 14 September 2019].

[6] ‘The central themes’, Moderna Museet (2015) https://www.modernamuseet.se/stockholm/en/exhibitions/olafur-eliasson/about-the-exhibition/ [Accessed 14 September 2019].

[7] ‘Olafur Eliasson shows Your body of work in San Paulo’, e-flux (15 June 2011) https://www.e-flux.com/announcements/35440/olafur-eliasson-shows-your-body-of-work-in-sao-paulo/ [Accessed 14 September 2019].

[8] Great Britain: Department of Transport, Know Your Traffic Signs (London: TSO, 2010)

CREATIVE WRITING

I am standing at a crossing. I push the button of the puffin crossing. “WAIT” lights up. The red light in the standing body shape turns to the green light in the walking body shape. I start to walk across the street. I turn left to continue on the path. I walk past a bus stop. I turn right exposed to a bigger crossing.

I am standing at a crossing. The Indian restaurant at the corner is not open yet. A flow of wind touches my face softly. I push the button of the puffin crossing. It absorbs a part of the energy from my finger to light up “WAIT”. A person comes and waits next to me. The red light in the standing body shape turns to the green light in the walking body shape. I suddenly remember my previous flat mate called it robot. I start to walk across the street. Two people walk towards and past me one by one. I turn left to continue on the path. Four people are waiting at the bus stop forward. I walk past the two chatting and hear their voices. I turn right exposed to a bigger crossing surrounded with a mixture of continuous and steady traffic noise.

I am standing at a crossing. The sun shines through my sunglasses. The Indian restaurant at the corner is not open yet. I don’t really like the staff always asking for cash. A flow of wind touches my face softly. A car drove closer and away. The noise got louder and quitter, back and forth. I push the button of the puffin crossing. It absorbs a part of the energy from my finger to light up “WAIT”. A girl in sports clothes with a gym bag comes and waits next to me. I wish I could make up my mind to work out as well. The red light in the standing body shape turns to the green light in the walking body shape. I suddenly remember my previous African flat mate in Australia called it robot and I laughed at how cute it sounded. I miss Australia. I start to walk across the street. A kid in uniform runs towards and past me, followed by a woman, probably his mom, asking him to slow down. It reminds me of my au pair experience in Mexico and the states, which made me realize I did not like kids. I turned left to continue on the path. Four people are waiting at the bus stop forward, a girl and a guy chatting and leaning against the stone wall behind the stop, a guy standing near the trash bin next to the stop and two women in black robes sitting on the red bench at the stop. I walk past the two chatting but cannot catch what they are talking about. I turn right exposed to a bigger crossing surrounded with a mixture of continuous and steady traffic noise. I feel I am almost going to fade while the low temperature of the air holds me together. Such an interesting conflict.

I am standing at a crossing…

INVESTIGATION

Wandering along the District tube line in London with my pair Olivia, I got interested in all kinds of direction signs on the roads and how citizens seemed to be efficiently directed on autopilot while Olivia was attracted to the ‘flawed beauty’ of marks of time on architecture.[1]

At the beginning, I wanted to create a space to bring conscious back to citizens to realize autopilot mode leaves no trace in memories or life (Figure 1).[2]It was going to be a double layered square space with one entry to each layer and a very narrow corridor in between to force people to move forward, suggesting the effect of direction signs, influenced by Bruce Nauman’s artwork of claustrophobic and enclosed corridors and rooms. In the inner square, each wall would be projected a video to create a sense of moving while viewers would actually only turn around in the center watching the videos (Figure 2-4), indicating the state of autopilot not creating any actual trace. The shaky videos would bring negative feelings and then conscious, similar to the situation of getting lost or off track. Finally, viewers would escape consciously.

However, after chatting with people, I started to realize citizens had their own choices and stories hidden behind all the directions they followed. There are more invisible traces than what we think we see. How the city and citizens look like sometimes depends on how we observe them in different perspectives, which is connected to Olivia’s idea of appreciating muted beauty.[3]In the end, I created another installation (Figure 5-8). It divided the floor to variable units of squares consisting of four arrows each, representing how the city is divided by crossings all over the roads. No matter how people move in the squares, they seem always directed to go straight, turn left or right, representing the typical patterns of citizens navigating in the city.

Three additive primary colors and a clear color were used to reproduce a broad array of colors. Observing people walking into and out of the cuboids, as you move around, multiple combinations of colors can be seen while only single combination is shown from one spot (Figure 9-12). It also applies to our way of perceiving the city and citizens. Different perspectives bring surprises and new discoveries while single perspective may only generate same feeling or vision every day.

This work was inspired by Olafur Eliasson’s installations, Seu corpo da obra (Your body of work) (Figure 13), Colour activity house(Figure 14) and Your rainbow panorama (Figure 15). Compositions of colors continually change in response to viewers’ movement through the space.[4]Viewers are co-producers of color as well as their image of reality.[5]We are viewers or producers of history itself, seen as we contribute, or give, more than we receive.[6]I was impressed by the setting of having viewers as a dynamic part of creators of the artwork. I found it very relative to my idea of observers as a vital role in creating the view of the city and citizens. Therefore, I decided to build a space for viewers to be able to change the view of colors while moving, standing for the initiative of forming their own experience in the city and with other citizens.

From this project, I have learnt using viewers as an active part of artwork and the phenomenon of color to relate to the form of our views towards the surroundings. The intention of my installation is to encourage citizens to see the city and each other from refreshing perspectives to find different aspects and stories and help them realize their role in getting an impression from their living environment. However, I do not think I have achieved my goal to investigate more deeply about the relations between citizens and the city and among citizens in a more personal or radical approach because my installation lacks innovation compared to Olafur Eliasson’s installations and my idea can be too generalized for some citizens.

With more time, I would experiment with the color schemes for direction signs in United Kingdom, blue with white, green with white and yellow, white with black and black on yellow, instead of RGB to relate to the theme closelier and installing my work outdoors in the busy area of the city instead of the studio to capture citizens’ real reaction or interaction with it.[7]Also, I would develop my idea in a more personal perspective of seeing the city instead of generating opinions on majority of citizens because it is very easy to fall into my own assumptions rather than facts. 

Bibliography

Berg, Anders, (2015), ‘Seu corpo da obra (Your body of work), 2011’, https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK107097/seu-corpo-da-obra-your-body-of-work[Accessed 14 September 2019]

e-flux, (15 June 2011), ‘Olafur Eliasson shows Your body of work in San Paulo’, https://www.e-flux.com/announcements/35440/olafur-eliasson-shows-your-body-of-work-in-sao-paulo/[Accessed 14 September 2019]

Gold, Taro, LivingWabi Sabi: The True Beauty of Your Life (Singapore: Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2004)

Great Britain: Department of Transport, Know Your Traffic Signs (London: TSO, 2010)

Keizo, KIOKU, (2010), ‘Colour activity house, 2010’, https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK100040/colour-activity-house[Accessed 14 September 2019]

Lawrence, Robyn, Simply Imperfect: Revising the Wabi-Sabi House(Gabriola Island: New Society Publishers, 2011)

Moderna Museet, (2015), ‘The central themes’, https://www.modernamuseet.se/stockholm/en/exhibitions/olafur-eliasson/about-the-exhibition/[Accessed 14 September 2019]

Wittmann, Marc, Felt Time: The Psychology of How We Perceive Time(Cambridge: MIT Press, 2016)‘Your rainbow panorama, 2006-2011’, (2011) https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK100551/your-rainbow-panorama[Accessed 14 September 2019]


[1]Taro Gold, LivingWabi Sabi: The True Beauty of Your Life (Singapore: Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2004)

[2]Marc Wittmann, Felt Time: The Psychology of How We Perceive Time(Cambridge: MIT Press, 2016)

[3]Robyn Griggs Lawrence, Simply Imperfect: Revising the Wabi-Sabi House(Gabriola Island: New Society Publishers, 2011)

[4]‘Seu corpo da obra (Your body of work), 2011’, Anders Sune Berg (2015) https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK107097/seu-corpo-da-obra-your-body-of-work[Accessed 14 September 2019]. ‘Colour activity house, 2010’, KIOKU Keizo (2010)https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK100040/colour-activity-house[Accessed 14 September 2019]. ‘Your rainbow panorama, 2006-2011’, (2011) https://olafureliasson.net/archive/artwork/WEK100551/your-rainbow-panorama[Accessed 14 September 2019].

[5]‘The central themes’, Moderna Museet (2015) https://www.modernamuseet.se/stockholm/en/exhibitions/olafur-eliasson/about-the-exhibition/[Accessed 14 September 2019].

[6]‘Olafur Eliasson shows Your body of work in San Paulo’, e-flux (15 June 2011) https://www.e-flux.com/announcements/35440/olafur-eliasson-shows-your-body-of-work-in-sao-paulo/[Accessed 14 September 2019].

[7]Great Britain: Department of Transport, Know Your Traffic Signs (London: TSO, 2010)